The Troubled Therapist

February 9, 2010

Freud, Sarah Palin and Tootsie Roll Pops

Filed under: comedy,humor,Uncategorized — Chuck A Stetson @ 4:04 PM
Tags: , , , ,

Imagine not being able to imagine images imagined while processing the stimuli of the real world in an imagined state. Freud understood that the ego mediates among the id, the super-ego and the external world. Its task is to find a balance between primitive drives and reality [the Ego devoid of morality and super majorities] while satisfying the id and super-ego. Its main concern is with the individual’s safety and allows some of the id’s desires to be expressed, but only when consequences of these actions are marginal and best served as margarine on scones or saltine crackers with no salt. It could mean one’s self-esteem, an inflated sense of self-worth, or in philosophical terms, one’s self would certainly be deflated and devalued in these uncertain times. However, according to Freud, the ego is the part of the mind that contains the consciousness constructed with Lincoln Logs, Legos and a set of psychic functions such as judgment, tolerance, reality-testing, control, planning, defense, synthesis of information, intellectual functioning, and memory [remembering all of this is key] while the ego is depicted to be half in the consciousness, while a quarter is in the preconscious and the other quarter [75%] lies in the unconscious consciousness of the unconscious. The imagery is staggering unless one can’t imagine said imagery or any flavor of Tootsie Roll Pops.

Overcoming non-imagination relies on forgetting about the id and the ego and focusing on the super-ego, wiffle balls and marshmallow fluff. The super-ego aims for perfection. It comprises that organized part of the personality structure, mainly but not entirely unconscious [unless you are comatose or freaked out with roid rage], that includes the individual’s ego ideals, spiritual goals, and the psychic agency [commonly called paranormal Panamanian pizza delivery] that criticizes and prohibits one’s drives, fantasies, feelings, and actions—especially actions that are non-reactive. The super-ego can be thought of as a type of conscience that punishes misbehavior with feelings of guilt, if said misbehavior causes disbelief, mischief or naked bungee jumping. For those suffering from not being able to imagine imagined images, be thankful, as naked bungee jumping can be gross.

What to do…  Treatment for non-imagination imagination requires that the super-ego work in contradiction to the id. The super-ego strives to act in a socially appropriate manner, whereas the id just wants instant self-gratification [masturbation or marinated meatballs if one is considering celibacy]. The super-ego controls our sense of right and wrong and guilt. It helps us fit into society by getting us to act in socially acceptable ways [think Sarah Palin making sense… yes, it’s difficult to imagine]. The super-ego’s demands that symbolic cymbals clash with the internalization of the father figure and cultural regulations is non-essential. The super-ego tends to stand in opposition to the desires of the id because of conflicting objectives, and aggressiveness towards the ego and Eggo waffles. Said super-ego is egocentric, acting as the conscience, maintaining our sense of morality and proscription from taboos and fungus toenails. Successful treatment requires strong pharmaceutical intervention, watching reruns of Family Guy and of course singing the song Imagine in a false falsetto with a tinge of titillating vibrato. Again… imagine Sarah Palin making sense… it’s easy… it isn’t hard to do. Well, yes, it is, but the imagery is unimaginable.

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1 Comment »

  1. Its like you read my mind! You seem to know a lot about this, like you wrote the book
    in it or something. I think that you can do with some pics
    to drive the message home a little bit, but instead of that, this is fantastic blog.
    An excellent read. I’ll definitely be back.

    Comment by Daisy — August 17, 2012 @ 2:55 PM | Reply


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